Frequently Asked Questions

Find answers to Frequently Asked Questions here:

Eligibility

Activities That DRF Supports

Application Procedures & Technical Issues

Relationships with Grantees

Eligibility

What types of organizations are eligible to apply for a Small Grant?
  • Legally registered non-governmental organizations, which are Disabled Persons Organizations (DPOs); or
  • Groups of persons with disabilities acting under the fiscal sponsorship thereof; or
  • Partnerships between self-help or self-advocacy groups of people with disabilities and other civil society organizations;

Small Grants are aimed at DPOs operating at sub-national levels. Partnerships are encouraged.

What are some examples of activities that may be eligible for Small Grants?

Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Increasing DPO knowledge on specific CRPD articles, for instance those referring to legal capacity and the autonomy to make decisions (Articles 12, 15, 17, 19), to inform concrete advocacy to government in those areas;
  • Advocating for the establishment of local disability rights focal points to monitor CRPD implementation in close consultation with DPOs, in line with Article 33;
  • In line with Article 4, advocating for concrete changes in local policy and legislation to accord with the CRPD. This could be done for example by: a) assessing accordance of local laws or polices with the CRPD to inform proposals for policy and legislative reform, where needed, or b) gathering information on human rights abuses of PWDs to inform policy advocacy;
  • In line with Article 28, developing advocacy strategies to include PWDs as beneficiaries of local poverty reduction strategies and social protection programs
  • In line with SDG Goal 4 (Education), advocating for local school authorities to increase access to inclusive education (in accordance with CRPD article 24)
  • In line with SDG Goal 1 (Poverty), advocating for disability-inclusive District budgets
What types of organizations are eligible to apply for a Mid-Level Coalition Grant?

The Mid-Level Coalition Grants funding stream supports civil society coalitions of three or more organizations at sub-national levels, to ensure that national legislation and policy (including development policy) is implemented at these more local levels, through disability-inclusive planning, budgeting and decision-making.

Mid-Level Coalition applications can only be submitted by the lead DPO or non-governmental family organization (representing children with disabilities, people with intellectual disabilities, and/or the Deafblind) on behalf of the entire Coalition. The applicant organization will be responsible for coordinating the Coalition, submitting the application,  andmanaging funds, and reporting on the grant.

Umbrella organizations or federations are considered one organization for the purposes of this application and, therefore, must form a coalition with other organizations to be eligible.

The requirements of the applicant organization (also known as ‘managing partner’) are to:

  • Be based, and legally registered, in one of DRF’s target countries
  • Be able to receive funds from the United States or use a fiscal sponsor that is legally registered and able to receive funds from the United States
  • Be a disabled persons’ organization or non-governmental family organization
  • Take overall responsibility for coordinating the Coalition for the life of the project
  • In federal countries, the Applicant organization and the application aim must have scope at state level. In other countries, the Applicant organization and the application aim must have scope at regional, provincial or district level.
  • Provide organizational income and expense statements for the past two years with the application
  • Provide a memorandum of understanding, submitted with the grant application, detailing responsibilities and signed by all Coalition partners, including the fiscal sponsor (if applicable) with the application
  • Submit the application
  • Once the grant is received, be responsible for the financial management of the grant
  • Submit timely reports to DRF
What are some examples of activities that may be eligible for Mid-Level Coalition Grants?

Examples include, but are not limited to:A coalition of organizations conducting research on how existing sub-national legislation relating to disability is in line (or not in line) with the CRPD;

  • A coalition of organizations conducting research on how existing sub-national legislation relating to disability is in line (or not in line) with the CRPD;
  • A coalition of DPOs and women’s rights organizations advocating to ensure that district maternal and child health regulations and programs are inclusive of women and girls with disabilities and that services are accessible to them in line with CRPD Articles 6 (Women with disabilities), 25 (Health) and SDG 5: Gender Equality;
  • A coalition of DPOs and legal aid organizations, working on strategic litigation to advance changes in legislation at State (or regional, provincial or district) levels to ensure accordance with the CRPD;
  • A coalition of DPOs advocating for a place at the table in development of local development policies to implement the SDGs;
  • A coalition of DPOs petitioning government for allocation of funding to support legislative or policy implementation, such as inclusive education policies in line with CRPD Article 24 (Education) or allocation of disability-inclusive funding to implement SDG Goals;
  • A coalition of DPOs and other civil society groups working on budget analysis to better understand and influence allocation of funding to various issues, including disability, at governmental levels.
What types of organizations are eligible to apply for a National Coalition grant?

The National Coalition Grants funding stream supports civil society coalitions of three or more organizations at national levels, working on specific priorities (see examples of activities, below). The lead applicant organization and the application aim must have scope at national level.

Applications must be submitted by onemanaging DPO or non-governmental family organization (representing children with disabilities, people with intellectual disabilities, and/or the Deafblind) on behalf of the entire coalition.

Umbrella organizations or federations are considered one organization for the purposes of this application and therefore, must form a coalition with other organizations outside their federation to be eligible.

The requirements of the lead applicant organization (also known as ‘managing partner’) are to:

  • Be legally registered, and based, in one of DRF’s target countries
  • Be able to receive funds from the United States or use a fiscal sponsor that is legally registered and able to receive funds from the United States
  • Be a disabled persons’ organization or non-governmental family organization
  • Take overall responsibility for coordinating the Coalition for the life of the project
  • Have national scope
  • Provide organizational income and expense statements for the past two years with the application
  • Provide a memorandum of understanding, submitted with the application, detailing responsibilities and signed by all Coalition partners, including the fiscal sponsor (if applicable) with the application
  • Submit the application
  • Once the grant is received, be responsible for the financial management of the grant
  • Submit timely reports to DRF
What are some examples of activities that may be eligible for National Coalition grants?

Examples of activities include, but are not limited to:

  • A coalition of cross-disability DPOs lobbying at national governmental levels for CRPD OP or Marrakesh Treaty ratification;
  • A coalition of cross-disability DPOs lobbying at national governmental levels for CRPD OP or Marrakesh Treaty ratification;
  • A coalition of DPOs advocating that their government present a national CRPD or SDG report and ensuring that representative organizations of PWDs are included in development of that report;
  • A coalition of DPOs coming together with other non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to present a submission to the Universal Periodic Review or SDG Voluntary National Review process;
  • A coalition of DPOs coming together with other NGOs to carry out advocacy for disability inclusive budgets to implement national action plans in line with CRPD Article 11 (Humanitarian action) and SDG 11 (Sustainable cities);
Do all members of a Mid-Level Coalition or National Coalition have to be DPOs?

No, however, the MAJORITY of organizations in the Coalition should be DPOs.

In addition, the lead applicant organization or managing partner of the Coalition must be a DPO or non-governmental family organization (representing children with disabilities, people with intellectual disabilities, and/or the Deafblind).

Partnerships with human rights organizations or other entities, such as the media, are encouraged.

Can one of the Mid-Level Coalition or National Coalition partners be a governmental entity? If so, can they receive funds? If so, do they count as one of three members required for eligibility?

Yes, a governmental entity can be a partner to the Coalition application; however, no DRF funds can go towards that governmental entity.

Governmental entities do not count as one of the three partner organizations necessary to meet eligibility requirements for a Mid-Level or National Coalition application. However, they can be a fourth or fifth partner.

What is the difference between a national umbrella or federation of DPOs and a “National Coalition”?

An umbrella / federation of DPOs is a membership organization with legal status. For the purposes of this application, a “National Coalition” may include an umbrella or federation organization, but it must include at least two additional distinct organizations that are not Federation members.

We are requiring this because we believe that encouraging broad partnership is critical to the advancement of human rights of all persons with disabilities.

If you think you have a unique situation and would like to apply for a National Coalition grant as one umbrella organization, please contact us at grants@disabilityrightsfund.org.

My organization is not based in the DRF target area. Will funds ever be available for organizations or groups in my country or locality?

The Disability Rights Fund foresees a continued expansion in terms of geographical coverage. The rate and extent of this expansion depends on our resources and ability to make substantive grants in the selected countries.

We are a civil society/non-governmental organization that works with people with disabilities. Can we apply?

The Disability Rights Fund is primarily interested indirectfunding to organizations and groups of people with disabilities.  If your organization partners with organizations or groups of people with disabilities, joint applications would be welcome as long as the group or organization of people with disabilities is the lead applicant (meaning that they are responsible for managing the project and the finances).

For Small Grants

You can apply if you meet anyone of the following four conditions:

  1. If your organization is of people with disabilities, meaning that people with disabilities constitute a majority  of staff and board members;
  2. If your organization is a fiscal sponsor to a new disabled persons’ organization (and they are heavily involved in the application process);
  3. If you host self-help or self-advocacy groups of people with disabilities who do not have legal registration; or
  4. If you are a legally registered non-governmental family organization representing children with disabilities, people with intellectual disabilities, and/or the Deafblind.

Please contact us at grants@disabilityrightsfund.orgif you are unsure if your organization or group qualifies.

We are a faith-based organization or a religious entity and we would like to apply for funding. Are we eligible to apply?

Yes. DRF recognizes that there are faith-based organizations/religious entities that have made significant contributions in advocating for the human rights of persons with disabilities and will therefore consider proposals from faith-based organizations/religious entities on an equal basis as other organizations.

However, faith-based organizations/religious entities must meet the same eligibility criteria as other applicants. See the following FAQ questions, “What types of organizations are eligible to apply for a Small Grant?” and “What types of organizations are eligible to apply for a Mid-Level Coalition or National Coalition Grant?”

In addition, DRF will not fund any organization which includes in their overall mission  proselytizing(which means to convert or attempt to convert (someone) from one religion, belief, or opinion to another or to persuade them to become religious).

Only organizations that demonstrate a rights-based approach will be considered.

If approved for a grant,

  • DRF funds may only be used towards the activities outlined in the submitted proposal.
  • No DRF funds may be used for religious activities or for proselytizing(which means toconvert or attempt to convert (someone) from one religion, belief, or opinion to another or to persuade them to become religious).
  • The project must benefit persons with disabilities without regard to religious affiliation.
Our organization or our fiscal sponsor’s main mission includes proselytizing, preaching, or spreading religious propaganda. Are we eligible to apply?

No.  DRF will not fund any organization which includes in their overall mission  proselytizing (which means to convert or attempt to convert (someone) from one religion, belief, or opinion to another or to persuade them to become religious).

In rare instances, DRF may consider funding some faith-based organizations as long as they demonstrate a clear rights-based approach and do not proselytize. Additionally, faith-based organizations must meet the same eligibility criteria as other applicants.

DRF respects all religions but has a strict “no proselytizing” policy to protect our grantees, funders, and staff from religious conflicts.

How does DRF define “proselytizing”?

For our purposes, proselytizing means to convert or attempt to convert (someone) from one religion, belief, or opinion to another or to persuade them to become religious. Proselytizing can be used with any religion or faith.

We are a public school / university and we’d like to apply for funding. Are we eligible?

No, we cannot provide funds to public institutions.

We are a governmental entity that works with persons with disabilities. Can we apply for funding?

No, we cannot provide funds to governmental entities.

We are a business or company that serves persons with disabilities. Can we apply?

No, we cannot provide funds to businesses or companies.

We have filed for registration and are awaiting approval from the relevant authorities. Can we apply?

For Small Grants

No, your organization must be legally registered. You may apply through a fiscal sponsor.

For Mid-Level and National Coalition Grants

No, your organization must be legally registered to be the lead applicant or managing partner

Is registration considered legitimate only if it is governmental registration (some organizations are registered with national non-profit NGO centers, for example)?

Yes, only governmental registration (at community or national levels) is legitimate.

In countries where there is additional registration or other requirements for accepting foreign funding, do we need to comply with these registration and requirements?

Yes, please check your government’s requirements on receiving foreign funds, specifically from the United States.

What is the basic eligibility for an organization to apply for a grant?

All applicants must meet basic eligibility criteria which is:

  • Legally registered non-governmental DPOs (or groups of PWDs) acting under the fiscal sponsorship[1]thereof
  • Based in one of our target countries, and apply to the specific round for that country

 

For more detailed eligibility criterias, read the following questions below on eligibility for specific grant types.

[1]A fiscal sponsor is an organization that is legally registered and eligible to receive funds from foreign donors. The fiscal sponsor takes on legal and fiduciary responsibility for management and reporting of grant funds and transfers funds to the applicant group of persons with disabilities to carry out project activities according to a Fiscal Sponsorship Agreement. Please contact DRF/DRAF  if you have questions about this process.

Activities that DRF Supports

Can we submit a proposal that focuses on more than one priority area?

Our answer varies depending on what type of grant you are applying for.

Small Grants proposals must focus on at least one of the priority areas listed below:

  • Increasing DPO capacity to participate in advocacy and decision-making processes regarding implementation of rights at local levels
  • Advocacy for inclusion of persons with disabilities in government programs – such as education, health or justice – and in government budget planning and implementation at the local level
  • Increasing DPO capacity to participate in advocacy and decision-making processes regarding implementation of the SDGs
  • Advocacy for inclusion of persons with disabilities in local government development programs (as part of SDG implementation) and in government budget planning and implementation 
  • In Pacific Island countries only: Ratification of the CRPD and/or the Optional Protocol (where not ratified)

Mid-Level Coalition proposals should focus on only one of the five priorities listed below:

  • Passage of specific sub-national legislation (including ordinances), policy, regulations, and/or budgetary priorities to accord with the CRPD
  • Advocacy for inclusion of persons with disabilities in government programs, such as education, health or justice, at the state (in a federal system), provincial, regional or district level in line with CRPD articles
  • Advocacy to ensure that development stakeholders and development planning at sub-national levels, to implement the SDGs, are inclusive of persons with disabilities and use the CRPD as a guiding document
  • In Pacific Island countries only: Ratification of the CRPD and/or the Optional Protocol (where not ratified) 

National Coalition proposals should focus on one of the priorities listed below:

  • Ratification of the Optional Protocol (OP) to the CRPD (where not ratified)
  • Passage or amendment of specific national legislation and policies to accord with the CRPD
  • Advocacy for budgetary measures as well as regulations to implement new or amended legislation and policy promoting the rights of persons with disabilities
  • Production of and/or follow up to Alternative Reports to the CRPD Committee and other human rights treaty bodies or reports to the Human Rights Council for the Universal Periodic Review (UPR)
  • Engagement with national government SDG focal point, civil society SDG platforms, and National Statistics Offices to ensure national action plans, programs, monitoring frameworks and data collection methods for implementing and monitoring the SDGs are inclusive of persons with disabilities and use the CRPD as a guiding document
  • Advocacy to ensure inclusion of a disability perspective in national governmental implementation and/or monitoring of the CRPD

For a detailed description of the priority areas, please refer to the section on Priority Areas in the Requests for Proposals.

Can partner organizations work separately on different priority areas in the same proposal (for Small Grants only)?

If partner organizations do not envision working together on activities, we would question why there is a partnership. Partnerships should demonstrate a rationale for their joint work and ideally should demonstrate some past experiences of effectively working together.

Are there particular CRPD articles that DRF wants organizations to focus on?

DRF encourages applicants to identify CRPD articles that best apply to their organization’s work and/or the communities that they serve.

A strong application should:

  • Avoid general references to the CRPD
  • Focus on concrete rights areas or articles of interest within the CRPD
  • Indicate references to the specific articles that the project aims to advance
  • Take into consideration the expertise of the applicant organizations(s)
What are the Sustainable Development Goals and does my organization have to work on this issue?

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was adopted by the UN General Assembly on September 25, 2015. The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) build on the Millennium Development Goals. They seek to realize the human rights of all and to achieve gender equality and empowerment of all women and girls. They balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social, and environmental. National governments, development agencies, and other donors will be using the Agenda and the SDGs as a plan of action. See https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/sdgs for more information.

All applications to DRF should indicate clearly how their projects are addressing both the articles of the CRPD and the goals of the SDGs to ensure that development efforts are inclusive of persons with disabilities in the implementation of the SDGs.

All applications should track activities on specific articles of the CRPD and specific goals of the SDGs.

Are there particular SDG goals that DRF wants organizations to focus on?

DRF encourages applicants to identify SDG goals that best apply to their organization’s work and/or the communities that they serve.

A strong application should:

  • Avoid general references to the SDGs
  • Focus on concrete goals within the SDGs
  • Indicate references to the specific goals that the project aims to advance
  • Take into consideration the expertise of the applicant organizations(s)
We would like to do lobbying as part of our project. Will DRF fund lobbying?

No, DRF does not fund lobbying work, as defined in U.S. legal terms. Lobbying refers to any advocacy for specific legislative change, including treaty ratification.

We will refer lobbying projects to our sister fund, the Disability Rights Advocacy Fund (DRAF).

Do you provide funds for general operating expenses?

While a portion of the funds can be used to cover general operating expenses, the majority of the funds need to be used for the specific activities of your proposed project.

Can we submit a proposal that focuses on a religious activity?

No.  While DRF will accept applications from faith-based organizations or religious entities, DRF will not consider any proposals to support religious activity of any kind. This includes proselytization.

Do you provide funds for service provision, including income generation?

No, we do not provide grants for service provision.

What do you mean by “service provision”?

Service provision is a term used to describe a wide range of activities, including the provision of assistive devices, rehabilitation services, occupational therapy and health services.

Does the fund support individuals with disabilities applying for travel or other fees related to attendance at international conferences, congresses, seminars, or gaining training in other countries?

No.

Where can I find more information about other funding sources, and resources and tools on disability?

Please see the Webpage Resources.

Application Procedures and Technical Issues

Is there a letter of interest process?

It depends on the country. Currently, there is a letter of interest (LoI) process for the following target countries only: Haiti, Indonesia, and Uganda. The LoI for Round 1, if applicable, will be announced in January each year.  For Round 2, if applicable, the LoI will be announced in July each year.

What is a letter of interest?

A letter of interest is a document submitted by an applicant seeking a grant for a project. Letters of interest describe the organization’s background, summarize the project’s goals, and provide project financial information. Letters of interest are a first step in a longer process. If a letter of interest is evaluated favorably, an applicant will be asked to submit a full proposal.

For organizations based in Haiti, Indonesia, and Uganda who did not receive funding in 2018, applicants must first submit a letter of interest to DRF within specified deadlines.

DRF Program team members review the letter and if approved, ask the applicant to submit a full proposal. If an organization misses the deadline for a letter of interest, they must wait until the following year to submit a letter of interest.

Do we need to use your grant application form?

Yes, you must use the format(s) provided.

Do we need to complete all forms on the checklist?

Required documents are indicated in the Application Checklist, which should be reviewed carefully.

What is the deadline for proposals?

Proposal deadlines vary from year to year. Please visit www.disabilityrightsfund.org/for-grantseekers for details about proposal deadlines.

In what languages can proposals be submitted?

Applications can be submitted in Bahasa Indonesian, English, French, and Haitian Creole. Note, DRF will provide applications in Bahasa Indonesian, English and French, but applicants may respond to the French application using Haitian Creole.

We are having trouble opening or saving the application forms from the website. What should we do?

Please send your request by email to grants@disabilityrightsfund.org.

We can’t send the proposal by email. How should we send the proposal?

The proposal can be sent by mail, fax or email. Our mailing address is:

Disability Rights Fund
89 South Street, Suite 203
Boston MA, 02111
USA

Fax: 1-617-261-1977
Email: grants@disabilityrightsfund.org

If you are sending a proposal by mail, it must be received at our office by the deadline. Please inform us if you are mailing the application.

Do you need copies of registration documents? Does the registration need to be translated into English? How should we send this to you?

For Small Grants

The applicant organization must submit documents showing that the organization is legally registered as a non-governmental or civil society organization in your country.

For partnerships, the applicant organization must submit the legal registration.

If you are applying under a fiscal sponsor, you must submit the legal registration for the fiscal sponsor.

The registration does not need to be translated into English. However, if you have a copy of the registration translated in English, please submit this.

The registration should be submitted with your application.

For Mid-Level and National Coalition Grants

The applicant organization or managing partner must submit documents showing that the organization is legally registered as a non-governmental or civil society organization in your country.

When will we know whether our proposal has been approved?

We will inform all applicants by July for the first round of grants and by December for the second round of grants.

Advocacy efforts take longer than one year. Can’t we apply for multiple year funding?

Small grants are awarded up to 20,000 USD for a one-year period only.  If DRF is targeting your country for another year, then grantees may reapply for another small grant following the same procedures for first-time applicants.

Applications for National Coalition grants can be for USD 30,000 – 50,000 per year for two years (USD 60,000 – 100,000 over the course of two years).

Mid-Level Coalition grants can be for USD 30,000 – 40,000 per year for two years (USD 60,000 – 80,000 over the course of two years).

Note that while you may apply for two years under a Mid-Level or National Coalition Grant, these grants are awarded year by year, and a second year award depends on satisfactory progress of the first year of activities.

Relationships with Grantees

Does DRF provide funds to individuals or grantees to attend a conference or training?

DRF does not provide funds or scholarships to individuals to attend a conference.  In some instances, DRF will support a grantee to attend a conference, a human rights monitoring mechanism review,  or training that falls under our advocacy or technical assistance strategy.  Grantees should discuss this with their DRF/DRAF Program Officer.

We were approved for DRF/DRAF funding, can we begin our project earlier than September 1 (Round 1) or January 1 (Round 2)?

Project start dates for Round 1 grantees is September 1stand for Round 2 grantees is January 1st.  If a grantee wants to start their project earlier, they must discuss their rationale with their DRF/DRAF Program Officer and receive approval before amending dates.

What is the difference between the Disability Rights Fund (DRF) and the Disability Rights Advocacy Fund?

Due to United States’ federal tax laws on funding lobbying activities, DRF operates as two separate entities – the Disability Rights Fund (DRF) and the Disability Rights Advocacy Fund (DRAF)  Our sister fund, DRAF, supports advocacy for treaty ratification and legislative change in target countries. Any grant application received by DRF for lobbying activities will be reviewed, and potentially funded, by DRAF.  Grantees who receive DRAF funding will need to credit the Disability Rights Advocacy Fund as funding their work.  For more information about DRAF, visit http://www.drafund.org/.

What are examples of advocacy outcomes for organizations that implement projects DRF/DRAF mid-level or national coalition grants?

For projects promoting changes in attitudes and behaviors:

  • Policy Development – Creating a new policy proposal, proposals for policy change or policy guidelines
  • Placement on the Policy Agenda – The appearance of an issue or policy proposal on the list of issues that policymakers give serious attention
  • Policy Adoption – Successful passing of a policy proposal through an ordinance, ballot measure, legislation, or legal agreement
  • Policy Blocking- Successful opposition to a policy proposal
  • Policy Implementation- Proper implementation of a policy, along with the funding, resources, or quality assurance to ensure it
  • Policy Monitoring and Evaluation- Tracking a policy to ensure it is implemented properly and achieves its intended impacts
  • Policy Maintenance- Preventing cuts or other negative changes to a policy

For projects promoting changes in attitudes and behaviors:

  • Organizational Capacity – The ability of an organization or coalition to lead, adapt, manage and implement an advocacy strategy
  • Partnerships or Alliances- Mutually beneficial relationships with other organizations or individuals who support or participate in an advocacy strategy
  • Collaboration and Alignment (including messaging) Individuals or groups coordinating their work and acting together
  • New Advocates (including unlikely or non-traditional)- Previously unengaged individuals who take action in support of an issue or position
  • New Champions (including policymakers) – High-profile individuals who adopt an issue and publicly advocate for it
  • Organizational Visibility or Recognition- Identification of an organization or campaign as a credible source on an issue
  • Awareness- Audience recognition that a problem exists or familiarity with a policy proposal
  • Salience- The importance a target audience assigns an issue or policy proposal
  • Attitudes or Beliefs- Target audiences’ thoughts, feelings or judgments about an issue or policy proposal
  • Public Will- Willingness of a (non-policymaker) target audience to act in support of an issue or policy proposal
  • Political Will- Willingness of policymakers to act in support of an issue or policy proposal
  • Constituency or Support Base Growth- Increase in the number of individuals who can be counted on for sustained advocacy or action on an issue
What are examples of advocacy outcomes for organizations that implement projects with DRF/DRAF small grants?

For projects promoting changes in attitudes and behaviors:

  • New Champions (including policymakers) – High-profile individuals who adopt an issue and publicly advocate for it
  • Awareness – Public/community recognition that a problem exists or familiarity with a proposal for policy change or new policy proposal
  • Salience – The importance a target audience assigns an issue or policy proposal
  • Attitudes or Beliefs – Target audiences’ thoughts, feelings or judgments about an issue or policy proposal
  • Constituency or Support Base Growth – Increase in the number of individuals who can be counted on for sustained advocacy or action on an issue

For projects promoting changes in government programs and practices:

  • Budgetary Allocations – Changes in local level government budget allocations that support the implementation of an inclusive policy
  • Programs and practices- Local government programs become inclusive of the diverse needs of persons with disabilities (for example, local health programs are inclusive and accessible to persons with disabilities) with the input of persons with disabilities OR local service providers change the way they respond to the needs of persons with disabilities by proactively outreaching to persons with disabilities and being inclusive of their needs in services by providing reasonable accommodations
Is the support given by the Disability Rights Fund only financial or are other forms of support available?

We provide or coordinate technical assistance, as well as grants, to strengthen the capacity of DPOs in key areas relevant to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Sustainable Development Goals. The focus of technical assistance we provide includes increasing Grantee knowledge and skills relevant to the CRPD and the SDGs, rights advocacy, monitoring of human rights and inclusive development processes, and forming alliances within and across movements. The technical assistance we provide is tailored to the priorities of the disability movement in each country context and, therefore, may vary from country to country. During the course of the funding relationship, the technical assistance may include: brokering linkages with subject matter experts, training, sharing resources, as well as one to one support from our staff.

We also support grantees through our own advocacy at the national, regional and global levels to ensure no one is left behind.

To learn more about DRF’s Technical Assistance Strategy, visit our TA Strategy page.

What are the reporting requirements?

Following grant approval, reporting forms and report deadlines will be provided with Grant Award Letters and/or Grant Agreements.

For Small Grants, organizations that received one tranche of funding are required to submit a final narrative and financial report. Organizations that received two tranches will be required to submit a narrative and financial progress report before the second tranche is considered; final narrative and financial reports will also be required at the end of the project.

For Mid-Level and National Coalition grants, organizations will be required to submit one (narrative and financial) progress report in the first year, unless receiving the grant in two tranches (when two reports will be required). If a second-year grant is given, a final (narrative and financial) report will be required. Reporting forms will be provided upon grant approval. Grantees are strongly encouraged to respond to inquiries from DRF staff in between project reporting periods, including responding to our Grantee Capacity Survey (distributed in January 2020), and may also receive a site visit during the project period.

Once a grant is approved, will reporting need to be completed in English or can other languages be used for reporting?

Reporting can be done in any of the five languages (Bahasa Indonesia, Burmese, English, French, and Haitian Creole) listed in our Request for Proposals.

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